BRUSHES I   use   a   large   soft   hair   flat   for   big   washes, a     size     10     round     for     general     use,     a Kolinsky    sable    size    7    round    for    more detailed   work   and   a   small   swordliner   for branches   and   squiggles.   Brush   selection is     very     personal.     Regular     visitors     will notice   I   have   changed   my   selection   over the   years,   but   the   constant   factor   is   that all   brushes   release   the   paint   gently   and evenly.    Avoid    bristle    brushes.    They    are designed   for   oils   and   are   much   too   harsh for     watercolour.     Don’t     use     them     for lifting   out   -   with   my   ancient   size   8   sable   I can     lift     out     the     finest     line.     Synthetic brushes   are   getting   better   all   the   time   so don’t   discount   them   and   ignore   the   often repeated   idea   that   a   sable   brush   will   last a    lifetime.    It    won’t.    The    point    will    wear away within a few months of regular use.
PAINT I    recommend    artist’s    quality    tubes    from the   major   manufacturers   They   stay   moist for   longer,   have   more   pigment   and   often seem      more      transparent.      Like      most people,   I   love   a   bargain   but   please   avoid the    really    cheap    sets    of    paint    that    cost the   same   as   a   tube   of   decent   stuff   -   they are   horrible   and   completely   useless   even for   practice.   Colours   are   very   personal   - use   what   you   like   -   but   in   case   you   are interested I use: BLUES:   Ultramarine   (warm),   Phthalo   Blue GS (cool) REDS:    Cadmium    or    Pyrrol    (Winsor)    Red (warm) Quinacridone Magenta (cool) YELLOWS:       Cadmium       Yellow       (warm) Aureolin (cool) SPECIALS:    Quinacridone    Gold    -    A    lovely warm   yellow/gold.   Burnt   Sienna   -   A   dull orange   that   is   a   great   mixer,   dulling   too bright     greens     reds     and     blues.     White Gouache   -   perfect   for   highlights   but   use in moderation.
PAPER Use   only   reputable   makes   and   find   one or    two    that    you    like    and    stick    to    them. Different    weights    and    surfaces    of    the same   paper   can   behave   in   very   different ways.   I   use   Bockingford   200lb   NOT   (cold pressed)   for   most   of   my   work   but   I   also use     Saunders     200lb     NOT     and     rough, Millford     140lb     NOT,     and     Bockingford 140lb   HP   for   pen   and   wash,   all   made   by St.   Cuthbert’s   Mill.    With   heavier   paper   I just    tape    them    to    a    lightweight    plastic board    and    I    make    my    own    blocks    with lighter   paper.   Blocks   are   handy   because they   do   not   need   a   board   and   although the   paper   will   cockle   when   wet,   it   will   dry flat   as   long   as   you   do   not   remove   it   from the    block    until    it    is    completely      dry.    Hot pressed    paper    is    not    recommended    for beginners   as   the   paint   tends   to   stay   on the    surface,    making    it    very    difficult    to paint a smooth wash.
GRAHAME BOOTH 26 GILNAHIRK CRESCENT BELFAST, BT5 7DU NORTHERN IRELAND
 GRAHAME BOOTH 2016 | PRIVACY POLICY
Download the booklet Watercolour Fundamentals
BRUSHES I   use   a   large   soft   hair   flat   for   big   washes,   a   size   10   round   for general   use,   a   Kolinsky   sable   size   7   round   for   more   detailed work   and   a   small   swordliner   for   branches   and   squiggles.   Brush selection    is    very    personal.    Regular    visitors    will    notice    I    have changed   my   selection   over   the   years,   but   the   constant   factor   is that    all    brushes    release    the    paint    gently    and    evenly.    Avoid bristle   brushes.   They   are   designed   for   oils   and   are   much   too harsh   for   watercolour.   Don’t   use   them   for   lifting   out   -   with   my ancient    size    8    sable    I    can    lift    out    the    finest    line.    Synthetic brushes   are   getting   better   all   the   time   so   don’t   discount   them and   ignore   the   often   repeated   idea   that   a   sable   brush   will   last a    lifetime.    It    won’t.    The    point    will    wear    away    within    a    few months of regular use.
PAINT I       recommend       artist’s       quality       tubes       from       the       major manufacturers   They   stay   moist   for   longer,   have   more   pigment and    often    seem    more    transparent.    Like    most    people,    I    love    a bargain   but   please   avoid   the   really   cheap   sets   of   paint   that   cost the    same    as    a    tube    of    decent    stuff    -    they    are    horrible    and completely   useless   even   for   practice.   Colours   are   very   personal   - use what you like - but in case you are interested I use: BLUES: Ultramarine (warm), Phthalo Blue GS (cool) REDS:    Cadmium    or    Pyrrol    (Winsor)    Red    (warm)    Quinacridone Magenta (cool) YELLOWS: Cadmium Yellow (warm) Aureolin (cool) SPECIALS:   Quinacridone   Gold   -   A   lovely   warm   yellow/gold.   Burnt Sienna   -   A   dull   orange   that   is   a   great   mixer,   dulling   too   bright greens   reds   and   blues.   White   Gouache   -   perfect   for   highlights but use in moderation.
PAPER Use   only   reputable   makes   and   find   one   or   two   that   you   like and   stick   to   them.   Different   weights   and   surfaces   of   the   same paper    can    behave    in    very    different    ways.    I    use    Bockingford 200lb   NOT   (cold   pressed)   for   most   of   my   work   but   I   also   use Saunders    200lb    NOT    and    rough,    Millford    140lb    NOT,    and Bockingford    140lb    HP    for    pen    and    wash,    all    made    by    St. Cuthbert’s    Mill.     With    heavier    paper    I    just    tape    them    to    a lightweight    plastic    board    and    I    make    my    own    blocks    with lighter   paper.   Blocks   are   handy   because   they   do   not   need   a board   and   although   the   paper   will   cockle   when   wet,   it   will   dry flat   as   long   as   you   do   not   remove   it   from   the   block   until   it   is completely      dry.    Hot    pressed    paper    is    not    recommended    for beginners   as   the   paint   tends   to   stay   on   the   surface,   making   it very difficult to paint a smooth wash.
Download the booklet Watercolour Fundamentals Edgar Degas Art is not what you see, but what you make others see
 GRAHAME BOOTH 2016 | PRIVACY POLICY
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